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My Camera Editorial Advisory Board comment published on March 1, 2008, in response to the Camera’s question: Colorado could be among the first states to return to an all-paper-ballot election this November. Is an all-paper ballot the right way to go?

This bill and its bipartisan support is such great news. While it’s true that paper ballots don’t necessarily end all voter fraud, they do provide a paper trail that can be checked and rechecked. With minimal effort, voters can keep their ballots free of extra marks that could lead to scanners misinterpreting their intent. Another good aspect of this bill is the options for registered voters. Voters may request using voting machines at polling sites or mail-in ballots that must be returned to the county clerk’s office before Election Day.

I find it interesting that the main contention against an all-paper ballot election was voiced by county clerks who prefer only mail-in ballots. This view is 100-percent out of step with those I heard expressed during the caucuses. People aren’t just thinking “green” or paperless. They are thinking “one vote for one person.”

*This title was not part of the Camera publication.


Source: Daily Camera


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My Camera Editorial Advisory Board comment published on July 26, 2008, in response to the Camera’s question: By now, the more than 50,000 local people who requested mail-in ballots for the August primary elections have received their ballots. Colorado voters are also allowed to become permanent mail-ballot voters, meaning all of their ballots will be sent to their homes. But many people feel that voting in person, at the local polling place is better. What do you think?

Sen. Ken Gordon and Rep. Claire Levy’s bill last year created a new law and permanent mail-in voters in Colorado. That isn’t good. It allows those who in past elections disenfranchised themselves to now have a ballot sent to them every election. Voters who really care and are paying attention to issues and elections will have their votes diluted by those who care more about the location of their TV remote.

Voting in person requires voters to be positively identified. Poll watchers keep their eyes on the business of elections and voters cast their ballots without any identifying information attached to that ballot. Privacy of the polling booth is maintained, and your ballot didn’t get lost or stolen in the mail. If paper ballots remain the standard, or at least an option, to in-person voters, the best way to vote is to line up and wait your turn!

*This title was not part of the Camera publication.


Source: Daily Camera


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