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Archive for the ‘Scare wild animals’ Category

My Camera Editorial Advisory Board comment published on Jan. 24, 2009, in response to the Camera’s question: BOULDER, Colo. — As is typical for this region, wild animals have been in the news a lot lately. A Broomfield woman was attacked by coyotes — her dog helped to fend them off — and this week, a cow charged a woman on the South Boulder Creek Trail, knocking her down. Authorities have also been called by locals reporting mountain lions and bears. Are these isolated incidents or connected by some common thread? What do you think should be done about it?

Boulder hasn’t seen its last mountain lion running off with pets or hungry bear looking for a meal. Area coyote sightings and attacks on people and pets aren’t likely to end either without concerted efforts. Drought contributes to the problem as wild animals and humans increasingly share the same space. Protecting deer and prairie dogs, abandoning pets to the outdoors and urban life’s attractive meals and shelter also contribute.

A big problem is that wild animals are losing their fear of humans. That has got to change, but something will be lost.

In the spring in Boulder when a tired bear cub lounged in a tree, wildlife was cute. A mountain lion resting in the summer sun in a backyard was awesome. I felt amazed a few years ago when I saw two deer one morning trotting down my street, and a fox on a sidewalk at a busy intersection at dusk.

But, we must ask the Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks and the Colorado Division of Wildlife for help. A Web site could explain wild animal behaviors and allow residents to report an encounter or view a map of incidents locally. Signs up in known areas would help the public be vigilant. The Boulder County Commissioners getting involved in wildlife policies is a good move.

Residents can start their own neighborhood “Wildlife Watch” groups. They can use bear-proof garbage containers, get rid of compost piles, bird feeders or other attractive “free” food for wildlife. They can demand laws that don’t overly protect prairie dogs, deer and other predator food sources. But most of all, they must scare away wild animals.

*This title was not part of the Camera publication.


Source: Daily Camera


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